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Honors BA Process Students who wish to be considered for honors must apply to the director of undergraduate studies before the end of their third year. Eligible candidates must have a GPA of 3. To receive honors, students must develop an extended piece of research via a bachelor's essay under the approved supervision of a faculty member.

BA projects involving alternative media like film, photography, photo-essay, or art installation might be acceptable if accompanied by a written text.

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To execute a successful BA essay, students should begin considering their research question early on. Students should begin looking for a faculty supervisor in their third year and aim to have a topic identified by the beginning of the fourth year so that they have sufficient time to complete the necessary research and to write the paper. Students being recommended for honors must submit two copies of the completed paper to the program administrator no later than fifth week of the quarter of graduation.

The faculty supervisor must be chosen from the Anthropology faculty. Affiliated faculty may serve with approval of the director of undergraduate study. This program may accept a BA paper or project used to satisfy the same requirement in another major if certain conditions are met.

Approval from both program chairs is required. Students should consult with the chairs by the earliest BA proposal deadline or by the end of their third year, if neither program publishes a deadline. A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation. Populism and Its Discontents. Populism and its Discontents is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar.

Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within.

Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Does populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources.

Spring Prerequisite s: This is a 3CT Capstone Course.

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Before and since Anthropology became a discrete scientific field of study, questions about the biological reality, potential utility and misuse of the concept of race in Homo sapiens have been debated. We will read and discuss a sample of writings by 18th, 19th, and 20th century and contemporary authors who attempted to define human races and those who have promoted or debunked the utility of the concept of race with special attention to it role in retarding social progress, and the extermination and exploitation of some populations and individuals.

Winter Equivalent Course s: What does a study of the body teach us about governance and the experience of being governed? This course approaches bodies from three angles. First, bodies are targets of governance. They are objects to be reformed, regulated, contained, disciplined, educated, incarcerated, treated, trained, and "cared" for.

Next, as bodies get targeted for reform, they are also converted into potent sites of resistance and critique. Certain bodies in certain places elicit discomfort, unsettling common ideals of private and public, of developed and backward, of religious and secular, and, with them, dominant understandings of modern citizenship. Finally, bodies in their sensory and affective capacities are also mobilized as resources for crafting belonging beyond the assigned terms of law or the state.

In so doing, the hope is to generate new ways to make sense of matters near and far-from Lenin's body to Trump's hands, reproductive labor to sex work, dirty protest to women's marches, indigenous eco-rituals to queer intimacies. This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.

Anthropology of the Future. Two major subfields of anthropology - archaeology and ethnography - have traditionally been oriented around the human past and the human present.

But what about the future? Conceptions of the future and future-oriented behavior have long been understood to be a critical plane of difference between political economies, religions, and cultural groups, yet they have rarely been an explicit focus of study.

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When we shift the temporal frame to the future, questions that arise include: We will consider theories of temporality, past futures Aztec, Polynesian, Italianand movements such as millenarianism, messianic religions, Marxism, Dadaism, utopian communities, Afro-futurism, transhumanism, and today's neo-futurist movements that deploy radical technology and speculative design in response to looming climate change.

We will also explore the intimate relationship between speculative fiction e. LeGuin, Kurt Vonnegut and anthropology. Autumn Prerequisite s: Anthropology, Rural Life, Capitalism. Only a few short decades ago, rural societies were at the center of anthropological inquiry and key sources of ethnographic insight. Today, anthropological attentions have redirected toward cityscapes and urban experiences, leading a recent review piece to wonder: Peasants may have slipped by the wayside of analysis, but nearly half of the world's population today remains rural, and more than ever, countrysides are acutely affected by the economic transformations reshaping our world and the uncertainties facing our future: In a decidedly non-trendy move, then, this course will take the anthropology of peasantry as its focus, and will make the case that small-scale farming communities remain highly relevant sites for diagnosing capitalism's changing conditions and its lived consequences.

Our discussions will be at once historical, conceptual, and ethnographic, and will draw on a broad set of case-studies around the globe. We will review classic debates about peasantries in relation to the history of capitalism, and reflect on the analytical possibilities and limitations of the peasant concept. In the first part of the course, focusing on William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's monumental poetic work Lyrical Balladswe will consider the implications of revolutions abroad and of institutionalizations of arts and culture at home for the rise of modern literary culture in Romantic-era Britain.

Wordsworth famously envisioned a new role for the poet as that of a "man speaking to men" who could make "incidents and situations from common life" the proper matter of literature. As he did so, Wordsworth was confronting both the disappointed hope of the "blissful dawn" of the French Revolution and a cultural milieu reshaped by the emergence of institutions like the British Museumthe Royal Academy of Artand the National Gallery -all of which continue to define British national culture.

In the second part of the course, we will consider analogous developments of the present moment, including the institutionalization of new arts like fashion, to consider where in what scenes, and in what forms of writing and media we might look for Lyrical Ballads of our own time. Anthropology of Olympic Sport. If cultural differences are as powerful as Anthropology has conventionally stressed, how is it possible that over national and innumerable sub-national and transnational cultural formations have found common cause in the modern Olympic Games?

This course explores, theoretically and historically, the emergence of the Olympic Games as the liturgy of the world system of nation states and the current dialectic between the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Sports Industry.

Extensive reading and in independent research paper will be required. This seminar undertakes to explore "disability" from an anthropological perspective that recognizes it as a socially constructed concept with implications for our understanding of fundamental issues about culture, society, and individual differences.

We explore a wide range of theoretical, legal, ethical, and policy issues as they relate to the experiences of persons with disabilities, their families, and advocates. The final project is a presentation on the fieldwork.

Third- or fourth-year standing Equivalent Course s: Extensive reading and an independent research paper will be required. Climate change is arguably the greatest environmental, political and cultural challenge of our times. We are already beginning to feel its impacts in changing weather patterns and rising temperatures.

In the years to come, Earth scientists tell us that climate change will impact every human being on the planet. We need to become informed and engaged about what awaits us and what we can do to avoid worst - case scenarios. This 3 - week intensive course of study focuses on three key questions: Why did climate change happen? How is it impacting different communities across the world? What can be done to prepare the world for a more environmentally secure future?

Seminar discussions and site visits to a variety of local initiatives working toward clean energy and sustainability goals round out the program. The program leverages the intellectual resources of one of the world's most prestigious research universities and will aquaint you with a city that proudly stands on the cutting edge of sustainable urbanism.

Summer Equivalent Course s: Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. African Civilization introduces students to African history and cultures in a three-quarter sequence. Introduction to African Civilization I.

Part one of the sequence takes a historical approach. We consider how different types of historical evidence-documentary, oral, and material-can be used to investigate processes of change and transformation in Africa from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world in the fifteenth century. We will investigate state formation in comparative perspective and examine case studies from the Swahili coast, the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe.

The course also examines the diffusion of Islam, European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Autumn Equivalent Course s: Introduction to African Civilization II. The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture.

Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society.

Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Part Three investigates the long nineteenth century. It considers the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili coast, and Islamic reform movements across the Sahara. It will also explore connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent.

Spring Equivalent Course s: Since its inception as an academically institutionalized discipline, anthropology has always addressed the relation between a self-consciously modernizing West and its various and changing others.

Yet it has not always done so with sufficient critical attention to its own concepts and categories-a fact that has led, since at least the s, to considerable debate about the nature of the anthropological enterprise and its epistemological foundations. This course provides a brief critical introduction to the history of anthropological thought over the course of the discipline's long twentieth century, form the s to the present.

Although we focus on the North American and British traditions, we review important strains of French and, to a lesser extent, German social theory in chronicling the emergence and transformation of modern anthropology as an empirically based, but theoretically informed, practice of knowledge production about human sociality and culture.

This course is an anthropological and historical exploration of one of the most original and influential American musical genres in its social and cultural context. We examine transformations in the cultural meaning of the blues and its place within broader American cultural currents, the social and economic situation of blues musicians, and the political economy of blues within the wider music industry. The course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.

Making the Natural World: Foundations of Human Ecology. Humans have "made" the natural world both conceptually, through the creation of various ideas about nature, ecosystem, organism, and ecology, and materially, through millennia of direct action in and on the landscape. Students will consider the conceptual underpinnings of contemporary notions of ecology, environment, and balance through the examination of specific historical trajectories of anthropogenic landscape modification and human society.

ENST and are required of students who are majoring in Environmental Studies and may be taken in any order. Explorations in Oral Narrative. A study of storytelling in non-literate and folk societies, antecedent to the complexities of modern narrativity, itself anchored in and energized by literacy.

Despite the impact of literacy on modern minds, this course argues for the persistence of ancient themes, plots, characters, and motifs. A further argument is made for the foundational role of storytelling in the creation of culture and construction of society. The central place of storytelling is shown in the humanistic and social sciences: Student storytelling and performance of brief stories is encouraged and discussed in light of the main arguments of the course.

This course qualifies as a "Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology majors. Anthropology, Materiality, Meaningful Practice. The body is implicated in all facets of human life. It is at once constraint and enabler, relational and personal, "real" and "imagined. Anthropological theory has moved far from "Cartesian dualism" in which mind and body can and must be separate; this course will travel through ways of understanding bodies that have supplemented or bypassed this idea, or have existed outside of it entirely.

We will consider what it means to have a body, to know a body, to be defined by a body-in short, to live a body. This course's topical readings are oriented around the idea that "embodiment" involves both material entities and socially embedded processes.

We will consider experience, consciousness, sensation, perception, and affect; we will interrogate processes, functions, and ways of knowing that are often taken for granted; we will prise apart the ways power is inscribed on and with bodies, both internally and externally. To do so, we will balance theory and ethnography in both our consumption and production of scholarly material, including a final "auto-ethnography" in which students adopt a new body practice for the quarter.

Anthropology of Human-Plant Relationships. Food, drink, fuel, pharmaceuticals, clothing, cosmetics, construction material, furniture… Plants and their byproducts are everywhere we look. How have plants become so ubiquitous to human life? How have plants been used, adapted, processed, and sold over the course of history? How can studying plants and their interactions with humans provide a different perspective on the past, and insight into the future?

This course explores how humans have made plants "work," and how these working plants have, in turn, shaped the world in which we live. While often perceived as passive in comparison to human and animal counterparts, plants have played a critical role in shaping global social, economic, ecological, and political dynamics.

As desired products, plants have entangled far-flung individuals and societies into complex relationships that reverberate across time and space. This course will survey the history of human-plant interactions through three units: We will examine a wide range of case studies, in an effort to gain comparative and multivocal understanding of human-plant relationships. In doing so, course materials touch on topics of general anthropological interest: Welcome to the Good Life: What do we mean when we say "the good life"?

In the United States, the good life has long been synonymous with the idea of the American dream the white picket fence, secure union job, stable marriage with 2. But over the past several years, this romanticized image has increasingly been thrown into crisis with the rise of a destabilized national economy, political infighting, and in the aftermath of the housing collapse.

It seems as though the veil has been lifted and the American Dream has been exposed as a fantasy object, if not a complete impossibility. But for people of color, and black people in particular who have been historically disenfranchised and thus unable to access the housing, education, and medical resources necessary to make the American dream a reality, this fantasy has always already been understood as such.

Indeed, black experiences reveal how whiteness as a structural mechanism stands at the foundation of the American Dream. Of Otherness and Encounters.

Travelling as a mode of self-cultivation and world awareness has always captivated our imagination. How does reading ethnographies of tourism help us examine encounters with others as anthropology's central prerogative? From Emerson's quote - is the meaning of an encounter located within us or in the object? Is otherness some inherent quality or a product of specific narratives and practices?

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Encountering otherness being anthropology's primary research methodology, can ethnographers be compared to tourists? How is the discipline itself implicated in unequal power relations of cultural encounters? Our aim is to use anthropological insights to appraise the phenomenon of tourism as a whole, identifying its pros and cons; and to also flip this perspective to ask: The Meaning of Police.

The purpose of this class is to offer students an intellectual toolkit for thinking critically and engaging politically with contemporary problems of police. It will introduce classical as well as emerging themes, drawing on research from diverse social and geographical locations. We will discuss, among other things, the paradox of legal lawlessness, the relationship between law and the body, and the unstable distinction between public and private violence.

Paying attention to classed, sexed, and racialized notions of danger and threat, we will discuss the historical fabrication of criminality as well as the complex legacies of security and protection that underpin practices of criminal punishment. While subjecting policing to an anthropological interrogation-asking what police means for different people in different times and places-we will also consider the uneasy affinity between policemen and ethnographers in order to ask what it can teach us about police, and how it might illuminate our understanding of ethnography.

Celebrity and Science in Paleoanthropology. Information is gathered from films, taped interviews, autobiographies, biographies, pop publications, instructor's anecdotes, and samples of scientific writings.

This is a course on how to do ethnographic research. While recent decades have seen scholars rightfully insist on the artistic and inherently personal quality of 'doing' and 'writing' ethnography, the course aims to illuminate the regulating structures of thought and practice underpinning every piece of original ethnographic work.

The course is both a reading and a research workshop. As a reading workshop, it seeks to enable students to read ethnography like ethnographers: As a research workshop, the course progressively leads students to construct and implement a research project of their own.

Students will methodically enact the physical techniques and analytic practices emerging from their reading of ethnography. Throughout the course, we will grapple with the challenges facing an ethnographic researcher, and identify the building blocks of an ethnographic project.

In this effort, we will focus on the posing of a research question; the formulation of conceptual frameworks; constructing a statement of problem; actors and informants; the semiotics and pragmatics of interviewing; analysis of interactions qua participant-observer, and historical approaches in ethnography.

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Please check the credit line adjacent to the illustration, as well as the front and back matter of the book for a list of credits. You must obtain permission directly from the owner of the image. Occasionally, Duke University Press controls the rights to maps or other drawings.

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